St. John’s Wort

Plant Profile: Hypericum kalmianum

St. John’s Wort is a small to medium sized shrub that blooms most of the season.
A hypericum shrub in flower is covered in golden blooms
Our St. John’s Wort shrub grows in the border garden overlooking the main wildlife planting.

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Kalm’s St. Johnswort – Hypericum kalmianum

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Hairy Beardtongue

plant profile: Penstemon hirsutus

A young seedling of hairy beardtongue awaits planting
Hairy beardtongue shares the stage with lance-leaved Coreopsis in early June

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Hairy beardtongue – Penstemon hirsutus

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Rosin Weed

Plant Profile: Silphium integrifolium

Rosin weed grows tall and is beloved by pollinators and songbirds alike.
Don’t be fooled by its size at planting time. Rosin weed is one of the tallest plants in our wildlife garden. It easily grows over 4 ft high and strong enough for whole flocks of goldfinches to perch on it and feast upon its tasty seeds in autumn.

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Wholeleaf rosinweed – Silphium integrifolium

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Yellow Coneflower

plant profile: Ratibida pinnata

Yellow coneflower is long-blooming and robust, deer and drought tolerant
A young seedling awaits planting in the garden. Yellow cone flower can have several different leaf shapes depending on the stage of its development.
Also called “gray-headed coneflower” its petals curve downward and flower centers resemble thimbles. Yellow coneflower is a prolific self seeder. It thrives in full sun.

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Yellow coneflower  – Ratibida pinnata

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Prairie Smoke

plant profile: Geum triflorum

Prairie Smoke is a very unusual flower. It grows low to the ground and is a member of the Geum genus. It thrives in partial shade, but can be quickly overrun by more vigorous plants.

Prairie smoke has dainty pink buds and delicately cut leaves.
The name “Prairie Smoke” refers to the halo of fine filaments that surrounds each bloom.

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Prairie smoke – Geum triflorum

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Downy Sunflower

plant profile: Helianthus mollis

Downy sunflowers shine brightly in the late summer sun. Distinctive velvety leaves and buds make downy sunflower easy to identify. The flowers are favored by pollinators and the seeds attract chickadees looking for a tasty snack in winter.
Downy sunflower emerging in the spring
Tiny hairs flock the stems of downy sunflowers. Each developing bud shows a dark mysterious center behind rows of petals and calyxes which resemble tightly clasped claws.

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Downy sunflower – Helianthus mollis

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Upland White Goldenrod

plant profile:  Solidago ptarmicoides

A plant of many common names: Prairie Goldenrod, Prairie Flat-top-goldenrod, Upland White Aster, Stiff Aster, Sneezewort Aster

Prairie (Upland white) goldenrod

And a plant of many different botanical names as well: Aster ptarmicoidesAster ptarmicoides var. georgianusDoellingeria ptarmicoidesInula albaSolidago asteroidesSolidago ptarmicoidesUnamia alba

Whatever you call it – upland white goldenrod looks very different from other goldenrods. Inconspicuous when first emerging, it blooms in clouds of little white aster-like flowers in late summer.

Leatherback beetles and other pollinators love the pollen of Upland White Goldenrod

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Prairie (Upland white) goldenrod – Oligoneuron album

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